Another Silent Spring; Pesticides don’t just kill pests

insecticide

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Originial Article appears at NatGeo News

New research out of the Netherlands provides compelling evidence linking a widely used class of insecticides to population declines across 14 species of birds

Birds and Honeybees as well as other beneficial insects being wiped out by indiscriminate use of powerful pesticides…

Excerpt from the NatGeo Article:

Those insecticides, called neonicotinoids, have been in the news lately due to the way they hurt bees and other pollinators. (Related: “The Plight of the Honeybee.”)

This new paper, published online Wednesday in Nature, gets at another angle of the story—the way these chemicals can indirectly affect other creatures in the ecosystem.

Scientists from Radboud University in Nijmegen and the Dutch Centre for Field Ornithology and Birdlife Netherlands (SOVON) compared long-term data sets for both farmland bird populations and chemical concentrations in surface water. They found that in areas where water contained high concentrations of imidacloprid—a common neonicotinoid pesticide—bird populations tended to decline by an average of 3.5 percent annually.

“I think we are the first to show that this insecticide may have wide-scale, significant effects on our environment,” said Hans de Kroon, an expert on population dynamics at Radboud University and one of the authors of the paper.

Second Silent Spring?

Pesticides and birds: If this story sounds familiar, it’s probably because…

See the entire Article

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